General, Kentucky Orthotic Prosthetic, Orthotic Prosthetic Continuing Education, Orthotics and Prosthetics State Meetings

Registration is OPEN for the June 11-12, 2020 KOPA Online Meeting

kopa
What you need to know.
  1. This meeting will be held online. All presentation times are Eastern Standard Time.
  2. Meeting fee is $10.00 for KOPA members. (Your 2020 dues will be collected as part of the registration.) $70.00 total.cailor_diamond_sponsor
  3. You are eligible to register at KOPA member rate if you work in KY or you work for a company that has an office in KY.
  4. It is $100.00 for non-members.
  5. Please note: If you cannot show up for the live event on June 11th and/or June 12th, you will not receive a refund as the event will be recorded and you will be able to attend the recorded sessions until July 31, 2020.
  6. You do not need to attend every session if you have a scheduling conflict as you can come back to the recorded sessions after the event is over up until July 31, 2020. So, no refunds.
  7. You will receive credits for the sessions that you attend regardless of the day.
Agenda
Orthotic Fitter/CPed Program – Thursday, June 11, 2020
9:25am Welcome
(Fitter) Breakout Room
9:30-10:30am Spinal Orthoses, A Deeper View, Going Beyond a Commercial Approach, Carey Jinright, LO
10:45-11:45am Advanced Shoe Fitting, Billy Kanter, CPed
11:45am-1:15pm EST Lunch Break
(Fitter) Breakout Room
1:15-2:15pm Understanding Causes and Management of Partial Foot Amputations, Dennis Janisse, CPed
2:30-3:30pm How, Why, What: Ulcerated and Post-Ulcerated Feet, Dennis Janisse, CPed
3:45pm-5:45pm ACM (NCOPE’s Approved Clinical Mentor)*, Chris Robinson, MS, MBA, CPO, ATC, FAAOP (D) – Questions? Ask us.
*You must complete the recorded ACM modules in order to participate in the ACM Live.
General Session/Orthotic and Prosthetic Program – Friday, June 12, 2020
General Session Room
8:15am-9:15am Medicare Updates for O&P, Teresa Camfield, CGS
(P) Breakout Room One
9:30-10:30am SCUBA Research, Michael McCauley, MS, CPO/L, Duffy Felmlee, MSPO, CPO, FAAOP
10:45-11:45am Clinical Application for an Adjustable Volume Socket, Keith Cornell, CP
(O) Breakout Room Two
9:30-10:30am Orthoses for Various Uses: Plagiocephaly, Charcot Foot Issues, and Kids with Gait Anomalies, Bill Carlton, CO/L
10:45-11:45am Carbon Infused Polypropylene: Reimbursement, Fabrication and Clinical Implications, Gary G. Bedard, CO, FAAOP
11:45-1:15pm EST
Lunch Break – Time to eat lunch, complete eval forms and quizzes and visit the Exhibit Hall!
(P) Breakout Room One
1:15-2:15pm Understanding Vocational Rehabilitation & the Amputee, J. Chad Duncan, PhD, CRC, CPO
2:30-3:30pm “Holistic” Amputation Rehabilitation Protocols, New and Old for Best Outcomes, Craig Lombard, CP/L
(O) Breakout Room Two
1:15-2:15pm Overview of High Intensity/High Repetition Gait Training for Stroke Patients, John Frederick, CPO/L and Caitlin Deom, PT
2:30-3:30pm Solving Complex Foot and Ankle Alignment Issues with Case Studies,
Marmaduke Loke, CO
General Session Room
3:45-4:45pm O&P in the time of COVID-19, Invited Speaker
4:45-5:00pm Complete eval forms and quizzes and visit the vendors in the Exhibit Hall
Register-Now-button-red
General, Orthotic Prosthetic Continuing Education, Orthotics and Prosthetics State Meetings, Texas Orthotic Prosthetic

TDLR Waives Continuing Education, Other Requirements for Texas Orthotic and Prosthetic Professionals

TDLR Waives Continuing Education, Other Requirements

TDLR continuing education requirements are waived for all individual licenses expiring in March, April, May, and June 2020.

Licensees still need to submit their renewal applications, pay the required fees, and TDLR will check their criminal histories, but they will not need to complete any TDLR-required continuing education this licensing cycle. (§51.405, Occupations Code)

Note: TDLR is not authorized to waive continuing education requirements imposed by a certifying or credentialing entity other than TDLR. If a certifying entity requires continuing education to maintain certification, and certification is required for Texas licensure, then that continuing education must be completed.

If the certifying entity waives continuing education or allows it to be completed on a delayed basis due to COVID-19, then you may follow the certifying entity’s policy.

The only two certifying entities for individuals who are licensed in prosthetics and orthotics would be:

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General, Orthotic Prosthetic Continuing Education, Orthotics and Prosthetics State Meetings, US ISPO

2020 US ISPO Pacific Rim Conference

The 2020 US ISPO Pacific Rim Conference was held January 19-22, 2020 at the Sheraton Maui Resort on the beautiful island of Maui, Hawaii.

As part of the proceedings, US ISPO was proud to host the Hawaii movie premiere of “1500 Miles” an award-winning documentary featuring Nicole Ver Kuilen of Forrest Stump.

Red carpet scenes from the Hawaiian premiere of “1500 Miles

Below is the article “Losing limb has even higher cost: Prosthetics and orthotics conference comes to Maui” by KEHAULANI CERIZO of The Maui News.

Nicole Ver Kuilen is shown in a shot from her documentary “1500 Miles,” which made its Hawaii debut Jan. 21 in Kaanapali. Ver Kuilen, who spoke that same day during a prosthetics and orthotics conference in Kaanapali, completed a two-month, 1,500-mile triathlon from Seattle to San Diego in a limb made for walking only. Her goal through her nonprofit, Forrest Stump, is to make prosthetic technology accessible for all amputees. Forrest Stump photos

KAANAPALI — Losing a limb is one thing, but being crippled by insurance systems is quite another, according to athlete, amputee and advocate Nicole Ver Kuilen.

Ver Kuilen, 28, who’s known for completing a 1,500-mile West Coast triathlon a few years ago in an insurance-mandated prosthesis built only for walking, spoke last week in Kaanapali about the lack of access to proper prosthetic devices for the majority of people who need them.

“We’ve reached this point now where amputees are no longer disabled by their condition, but we’re disabled by the policies that are put in place,” she said.

Insurance policies say that having access to something waterproof is a “convenience item,” running is not “medically necessary” and having an ankle that bends is considered “vanity.” Even technology that’s been around for more than 20 years is considered “experimental,” Ver Kuilen said during her talk, “How Do We Expand Access to Prosthetic Technology From the 1 Percent to the 99 Percent?”

Ver Kuilen, who last year won her first paratriathlete national title, was among dozens of speakers at the 2020 U.S. ISPO Pacific Rim Conference for prosthetists and orthotists, technicians, orthopedic surgeons and other medical professionals, held Jan. 19 through Wednesday at Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa.

The award-winning short documentary on her ultratriathlon from Seattle to San Diego, “1500 Miles,” had its Hawaii premiere during the conference.

In Hawaii, lower-limb prostheses can range in price from about $9,000 to $65,000, depending on the amputation level and device design, according to Medicare estimates in a Prosthetic & Orthotic Associates of Hawaii report.

“Most private insurance will be reimbursed at a rate below that,” prosthetist and orthotist Cameron Lehrer, Oahu-based Prosthetic & Orthotic Associates of Hawaii owner, said Jan. 21 at the conference.

In fact, Hawaii is the only state where insurances do not cover microprocessor knees, which help mitigate falls for amputees, according to prosthetist Stan Patterson, another Prosthetic & Orthotic Associates of Hawaii owner.

Hawaii’s bulk of the lower-limb amputee population is those with diabetes, and the state’s incidence of diabetes is on the higher end compared with other states in the U.S., the group said. Also, Hawaii’s diabetes rates have been increasing over the last two decades.

In Hawaii hospitals, 710 amputations for various reasons were performed in 2014, according to the most recent data by the Amputee Coalition.

About 2 million people in the U.S. are currently living with limb loss and an estimated 185,000 amputations per year occur, the coalition said. This number is expected to double by 2050 due to rising diabetes and vascular disease rates.

The major causes of amputations are vascular disease (54 percent), including diabetes and peripheral arterial disease; trauma (45 percent); and cancer (less than 2 percent).

Eighteen years ago Jan. 21, Ver Kuilen, at age 10, had her leg amputated below the knee due to a rare bone cancer.

She has made it her life’s goal to expand access to prosthetic technology for all amputees and helped found Forrest Stump, a nonprofit advocacy organization with the same mission.

Ver Kuilen said during her talk that mass media has glamorized prosthetic technology, and Fortune 500 companies leverage by aligning brands with prosthetic success stories and devices. Some media reports go so far as to question whether people willingly amputate in order to gain a bionic limb.

“I mean, who here would trade any of your legs for any of the prosthetic technology you’ve seen during this conference?” she said. “There is no present technology out there today that can fully replace a human limb and it is alarming that our country is more concerned with the unfair advantage of a small amount of people than the unfair disadvantage the majority of us face on a daily basis.”

The average consumer does not realize how inaccessible and expensive prosthetic technology can be for the majority of amputees. With the exception of military individuals and Paralympic athletes, 99 percent of amputees living in the U.S. don’t get waterproof, running and other essential devices, Ver Kuilen said.

“This is not to say that the military and Paralympic athlete amputees are not deserving — they are deserving of access to prosthetic technology, but it’s the way in which our resources, our funding, our policies have been made that have perpetuated access for these select few and not granted access to the majority of amputees that are out there,” she said. “We need to focus on the real problem at hand, which is the unfair disadvantages that amputees are facing.”

* Kehaulani Cerizo can be reached at kcerizo@mauinews.com.

General, US ISPO

Hawaiian Premiere of “1500 Miles” at the US ISPO Pacific Rim Conference in Maui

2013-06-13-1FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: ELIZABETH MANSFIELD, BOARD CHAIR, US ISPO
ADMIN@USISPO.ORG, 833-487-4776 DIRECT

US ISPO to Bring Uplifting Ultratriathlon Documentary “1500 MILES” to MAUI

Join this special one-­time screening of a film that celebrates amputee athletic triumph.

LAHAINA, HAWAII, JANUARY 6, 2020 – US ISPO will be hosting the Hawaiian premiere of the award winning documentary “1500 MILES” at the Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa on January 21, 2020 at 1:30pm in the Maui Ballroom.

“1500 MILES” chronicles the accomplishments of 27-year-old amputee/ultratriathlete Nicole Ver Kuilen, in which she and a support team of three additional women completed a two-month, 1500-mile triathlon (called “Forrest Stump”) from Northern Washington to Southern California. The ultratriathlon event was undertaken to call attention to the discrimination against aspiring amputee athletes who are denied insurance coverage of appropriate prosthetic technology, allegedly to cut costs.

View the Trailer for the film at:  https://vimeo.com/236037173

  • Nicole Ver Kuilen is an amputee athlete who challenges herself to swim, bike, and run from Seattle to San Diego. She has the endurance and passion to make it to the end. The biggest question is: will her prosthesis survive the journey?

Immediately following the premiere, Nicole Ver Kuilen and Natalie Harold of Forrest Stump (http://www.forreststump.org/) will join an international panel of rehabilitation medicine experts to discuss the issue of access to care for the limb loss population.

The film is being screened in association with US ISPO (https://www.usispo.org/), the United States Member Nation Society of ISPO (https://www.ispoint.org/page/About). ISPO is a global multidisciplinary organization, of over 75 member nation societies, that promotes access to appropriate and equitable rehabilitation, mobility devices, and other assistive technology to improve the quality of life for people with reduced mobility.

Tickets can be obtained at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hawaiian-premiere-of-award-winning-documentary-1500-miles-tickets-88580842685?ref=estw

“I just want to run. I want to be free to move. I want to be an athlete. I want to be like everyone else.” said Nicole Ver Kuilen.  “I hope one day our society can become more compassionate and empathetic to understand the struggles people without privilege face, and use that knowledge to guide decision making. You don’t need to walk a mile in my shoes to understand; you need to open your heart to being more compassionate.”

Download images and video clips at:  http://www.forreststump.org/1500-milesFS

General, Orthotic Prosthetic Continuing Education

Partnering with Physical Therapists – Getting More Attention

The O&P Almanac’s December 2019 cover story is titled, Team Building, O&P Partners with PT in a More Collaborative Approach to Patient Care.

The article emphasizes the importance of a team approach to patient care in regards to limb loss. Christine Umbrell, contributing writer and editorial/production associate for O&P Almanac, speaks with four prosthetists and explores their relationships with the therapy community. Each practitioner explains how their collaborative efforts with physical therapists improve outcomes and the overall patient experience.

Betta Ferrendelli wrote an article for the The O&P Edge earlier this year, Partnering with Therapists: Improving Patient Access and Outcomes Through Collaboration. She wrote, ” When it comes to optimal patient care, the best recipe for patient success involves physical and occupational therapists and O&P providers working hand in hand.”

Clinical Education Concepts‘ Clinical Director Marc Werner, CPO, talked about providing continuing education to physical therapists in Deborah Conn’s July 2019 article in O&P Almanac’s Member Spotlight, The Human-and Animal-Connection.

“It makes sense that orthotists and prosthetists educate the therapy community about patients with limb and functional loss,” Werner said when asked about the article. Long Island O&P has provided over 1200 continuing education credits to over 900 therapists. 260 courses at 45 different therapy facilities since 2010! Collaborating with physical therapy is imperative to continually improving patient outcomes.”

Clinical Education Concepts provides course material to orthotists and prosthetists that can be presented to physical and occupational therapists. Contact CEC